MamaAtheist
And they did, including that now-infamous Mk-9 military-grade riot-control pepper sprayer that he used. Oh, funny thing about that particular model of pepper-sprayer? It’s illegal for California cops to possess or use. It turns out that the relevant law only permits the use of up to Mk-4 pepper sprayers. The consultants were unable to find out who authorized the purchase and carrying, but every cop they asked said, “So what? It’s just like the Mk-4 except that it has a higher capacity.” Uh, no. It’s also much, much higher pressure, and specifically designed not to be sprayed directly at any one person, only at crowds, and only from at least six feet away. The manufacturer says so. The person in charge of training California police in pepper spray says that as far as he knows, no California cop has ever received training, from his office or from the manufacturer, in how to safely use a Mk-9 sprayer, presumably because it’s illegal. But Officer Nameless, when he wrote the action plan for these arrests, included all pepper-spray equipment in the equipment list, both the paint-ball rifle pepper balls and the Mk-9 riot-control sprayers.

DAVIS, CA -UC Davis Police Chief Annette Spicuzza submitted her resignation letter Wednesday, which will take effective Thursday at 5 p.m.

Spicuzza came under fire after UC Davis police officers pepper-sprayed 11 Occupy UC Davis protesters on Nov. 18 2011.

Spicuzza, Lt. John Pike and another officer who used pepper spray were placed on administrative leave after the incident.

The day of the incident, Spicuzza said her officers were surrounded and acted to protect themselves from the crowd.

ladyatheist:

I participated in the #MillionHoodies march in New York City’s Union Square this past Wednesday, March 21st. When I arrived I noticed a lot less hoodies than I thought I was going to see. I assumed this was simply because of the warm weather. There was still an enormous crowd of people there to deal with the tragedy that was Trayvon Martin.

With chants of “We are the 99%” and signage to that effect as well, I was a little thrown off. I thought the purpose of this march was to bring awareness to the death of a young boy. Soon after the march started confusion was all around. Which way were we marching? Who was leading the charge? After we walked a few blocks members of the Occupy section of the march started running down the street knocking down trash cans. I was told later that some attempted to knock down police barricades and police scooters used to guide the marchers. I immediately became uncomfortable because that’s not what I signed up for. I wanted to speak out against injustice—just causing general destruction wasn’t on my agenda. Soon some Occupiers started chanting “F**k the POLICE,” one young white male wearing skinny jeans and a Justin Bieber haircut started yelling “THIS IS WAR, WE WANT WAR!” To which a hoodie-clad young black adult said “Hey, uh we don’t really want war, why don’t you tone that down. I’m about to graduate college in a few months.” The white male kind of laughed and kept moving forward yelling something else.

At various points in the march, as organizers tried to make statements, they were drowned out by Occupiers chanting whatever they saw fit at the time. It didn’t matter if there was a full-on people’s mic happening, they would attempt to push things their way. I asked Daniel Maree, one of the organizers of the #millionhoodies march what he thought of the co-option by Occupy and their actions.”Honestly,” Maree replied “I feel like this is what happens when these emotions build up and they go unchecked and you know, injustice continues, you get it boiling over like this. I’m just happy nobody got hurt.” And while Occupy did help swell the ranks of marchers, I found their actions unacceptable.

This isn’t simply about emotions. This is a consistent streak within certain sections of Occupy. Their goal isn’t a specific action within our current system. Often they want to make a point, show that they’re movement is doing things. In DC, their goal was to get arrested. In NYC, they seemed less concerned with marching for Trayvon and more concerned with occupying as much space as possible with whatever issue that would gather folks to their cause. Occupying.

When Occupy Wall Street first got the national spotlight they were so worried about the co-option of their message, yet they have no problem co-opting others. A couple of Occupiers recognized me and asked if I noticed some of the nonsense that was happening. I said yes and one of them explained that after this march and two months of working with Occupy, she and her friends no longer wanted to be associated with them.

Every time I attempt to have a conversation about issues within Occupy, I’m told that there are no leaders, and that some people do crazy things, but “that’s not OCCUPY.” I grow weary of actions without consequences and disrespect without anyone being held responsible. Just because a movement did some good doesn’t mean that it’s infallible. Occupy chapters have serious issues and there have been serious discussions about its relations with women and people of color. With incidents like what occurred on Wednesday, I see a clear reason why people of color don’t flock to the movement.

We don’t have enough privilege to carry us through it.

The bolded is so important. OWS is not infallible, perfect, or free from criticism. I’m beyond sick of people vilifying people who dare to criticize the movement. Occupy Wall Street is fundamentally flawed. You can’t keep putting your fingers in your ears and ignore the problems the movement has with racism and sexism.

Yes, agreed.

producermatthew:

From KXTV Sacramento:

In a pay package slated for review at this week’s Board of Trustees meeting, newly appointed CSU Fullerton President Mildred Garcia will get $324,500 in base pay, plus housing and a $12,000-per-year car allowance. That’s exactly 10 percent more than her predecessor, Milton Gordon, who in 2011 had a base salary of $295,000.

It’s also 10 percent more than Garcia earned in base pay at her previous post as president of CSU Dominguez Hills, according to CSU’s executive compensation summary.

Leroy Morishita, the new president at CSU East Bay, will get $303,660 plus $60,000 per year for housing and a $12,000 annual car allowance. That’s 10 percent above predecessor Mohammad Qayoumi’s base pay in 2010, as well as a 10 percent raise for Morishita, who had been serving as interim president in Qayoumi’s stead since July.

Several lawmakers have introduced legislation aimed at further reining in executive compensation at CSU and other state agencies. Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, introduced SB 967, which would prohibit the governing boards of CSU and the community colleges from providing raises for top executives during bad budget years or within two years of a student fee increase. It also would limit the pay of an incoming executive to no more than 5 percent above his or her predecessor.

Holy fuck that’s a nice fat salary.  My youngest is off to a CSU this fall, sigh…  By the way, State Senator Leland Yee is great. He’s one of the good guys here in Cali.

brooklynmutt:

Some of those Occupy protesters who famously got face fulls of pepper spray last November on the campus of University of California Davis have now filed suit in federal court.

They allege “the university used excessive force to break up the demonstration,” The Sacramento Bee writes. “The Occupy UC Davis students were sprayed as they sat on the ground.”

The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California is assisting the 19 students and alumni who are suing.

More power to ‘em.

cartoonpolitics:

‘There’s none so deaf as those who will not hear’ .. (anon)

cartoonpolitics:

‘There’s none so deaf as those who will not hear’ .. (anon)

DAVIS (CBS13) — University administrators shelled out $100,000 for a media expert to help them manage the fallout from a videotaped confrontation with protestors that sparked outrage around the globe.

In the weeks following the November raid on Occupy UC Davis demonstrators that ended with police pepper-spraying students at close range, the University of California paid for the crisis consultant to handle public communications for Chancellor Linda Katehi and the administration as pictures and video spread.

Members of Occupy UC Davis, who are continuing to camp on campus, said the high price tag only makes university officials look worse in their eyes.

occupyonline:

No offense, but I think the problem is actually your failure to understand what it is we are fighting for. We are not fighting for laziness to be subsidized. We are fighting to have more justice, ethics, empathy and logic applied in defining what “hard work” and “paying your way and building a career” really mean. For example, can anyone truly justify low pay for teachers? Contribution to society is not just by measure of profit. THIS is why people are protesting, to beg for society to take just a few moments of their time to re-evaluate their views on what is deemed a worthy contribution to society. Educating our children so that they can become contributing members of society (not just as workers and laborers, but as visionaries, as fully developed humans with an understanding of self and other, awareness and empathy) is a vital contribution, but because it fails to bring in immediate profit, it is often over-looked, under-appreciated, and under-valued. Similarly, we do not value physical labor in this country. Everyone can agree that physical labor is an unpleasant thing to be forced to endure, yet millions must endure such due to lack of access, choice or faculty. Should someone who does not have the same level of intelligence or access to education or financial liberty be deemed unworthy for their vital contributions to society? Should one have to fear feeding one’s family after a day of hard labor? THESE are the issues we are trying to bring to the table. We are not asking to subsidize laziness, we are asking to fill in the cracks left unfilled in a purely profit-driven capitalistic/ corporate-fascist society. We are asking for corporate influence (i.e. billions of dollars in lobbying and campaign financing) to be taken OUT of our government and for regulations to be in place against concentrations of corporate power that allows for them to have so much undue influence on government. It really isn’t that complicated. If people continue to fail to understand what it is we stand for, it is not due to the Occupy Movement lacking definitive purpose or reason, but from people’s inability or unwillingness to understand.
*Reposted to be rebloggable at mamaatheist’s request. 

This is a fantastic response to the Anon.

occupyonline:

No offense, but I think the problem is actually your failure to understand what it is we are fighting for. We are not fighting for laziness to be subsidized. We are fighting to have more justice, ethics, empathy and logic applied in defining what “hard work” and “paying your way and building a career” really mean. For example, can anyone truly justify low pay for teachers? Contribution to society is not just by measure of profit. THIS is why people are protesting, to beg for society to take just a few moments of their time to re-evaluate their views on what is deemed a worthy contribution to society. Educating our children so that they can become contributing members of society (not just as workers and laborers, but as visionaries, as fully developed humans with an understanding of self and other, awareness and empathy) is a vital contribution, but because it fails to bring in immediate profit, it is often over-looked, under-appreciated, and under-valued. Similarly, we do not value physical labor in this country. Everyone can agree that physical labor is an unpleasant thing to be forced to endure, yet millions must endure such due to lack of access, choice or faculty. Should someone who does not have the same level of intelligence or access to education or financial liberty be deemed unworthy for their vital contributions to society? Should one have to fear feeding one’s family after a day of hard labor? THESE are the issues we are trying to bring to the table. We are not asking to subsidize laziness, we are asking to fill in the cracks left unfilled in a purely profit-driven capitalistic/ corporate-fascist society. We are asking for corporate influence (i.e. billions of dollars in lobbying and campaign financing) to be taken OUT of our government and for regulations to be in place against concentrations of corporate power that allows for them to have so much undue influence on government. It really isn’t that complicated. If people continue to fail to understand what it is we stand for, it is not due to the Occupy Movement lacking definitive purpose or reason, but from people’s inability or unwillingness to understand.

*Reposted to be rebloggable at mamaatheist’s request. 

This is a fantastic response to the Anon.

Another day, another protest in New York city. A powerful new video shot by Tim Pool from December 17, 2011. He uploaded several new videos from this day at his youtube channel.

The elderly lady at the end of the video interviewed by Tim Pool on December 17th expresses feelings which I am sure most of us would support - don’t miss her damning remarks.

Tim is today featured in an article at Time Techland which reveals that his next step in providing coverage of the Occupy protests will be from an aerial drone piloted via a smartphone. The drone will provide a unique perspective of both protesters and police and Tim will have several people at the protests who can assume coverage if the operator is arrested. This is a bold and exciting development and one that we can all look forward to.